How to Eat More Fruit

more fruit

So many people ask me about my diet. Most have a hard time believing that I just eat mostly fresh fruit.  Aside from wondering where I get my protein (which I get plenty of, thank you) they wonder how in the heck I can eat so much more fruit?

This question boggles my mind because I find after eating mostly fruit for the last few months that all I want to do is…eat more fruit. I don’t get bored eating the same fruit day after day for weeks on end.

For example, it’s the end of June now and it’s right in the middle of the season for melons like cantaloupe, honey dew and watermelon. I absolutely love, love, love melons…so this time of year is my fave.  Until they go out of season, I’ll enjoy eating these fruits every single day.

But wait, back to the questions…how can you eat that much fruit?  How can you eat just fruit as a meal? Most people like fruit all right, so they might eat a cup of blueberries, a banana or an apple a day.  If that’s all you’re currently eating, let’s up your game.

It’s easy to eat that much fruit or to eat a fruit-only meal if you know enough about fruit to avoid some common mistakes that can lead to less than optimal experiences:

Eat only ripe fruit – if you’ve ever eaten a banana that tastes more like bamboo than banana, then you’ve eaten fruit that isn’t ripe. If you’ve ever been disappointed by a tasteless cantaloupe or a firm avocado (which is a fruit), you’re probably eating unripe fruit.

Determining the ripeness of fruit depends on the fruit, of course. Bananas should have some brown spots. Avocados and papayas should have a fair amount of give when you press on them.  Cantaloupes that are ready to eat will have a strong sweet smell at the stem. Mangoes will have a strong smell and also feel soft to the touch.

You’ll use many of your senses, including sight, smell and feel to properly determine if your fruit is ready to eat.

Strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries should have a nice smell but you’ll mostly use color to determine ripeness.  Oranges should smell sweet and have a tender texture with wrinkles on the skin.  It will also feel heavy for it’s size.

If  you’re unsure about whether a fruit is ripe, just experiment.  Buy one or two and do a taste test.  You can also check out  Your Produce Guy for great videos on when to tell if fruit is ripe.

Learning to identify when fruit is ripe is part science and part art.  Getting good at it will greatly increase your enjoyment of fruit.  I highly recommend it.  The time and effort you invest will pay off handsomely.

Eat fruit in season – duh, you might be thinking. But too many people make the mistake that if it’s at their local grocery store it must be in season. Not necessarily true. If consumer demand is there, supermarket chains will do what they can to provide it. Blueberries in February? Watermelon in December? How cool is that?

Actually, it’s not really cool at all.  To get your blueberries in February, they have to be shipped from far away, they will cost a fortune, and they’ll likely taste terrible.

Eating fruit far removed from it’s natural growing season doesn’t make sense economically, globally or from a taste perspective. It’s disappointing to open up a watermelon in December that you paid a lot of money for and discover it tastes more like water than melon, and that it had to be shipped from Mexico.

You can research which fruits are in season and when, but a good way to tell is just to buy the fruit that your local grocery store or farmer’s market has on sale or on display.

Right now my local Trader Joe’s has organic mini watermelon and my favorite (and my dogs) cantaloupe on display as soon as you walk into the store. This is a good sign that these fruits are in season, relatively inexpensive and sometimes even local.

Adjust your fruit consumption to the season and you’ll be eating the most ripe as well as the most nutrient dense fruit.

Properly store your fruit – not keeping your fruit and even vegetables at proper temperatures will not only affect the taste, but often the ripening process. Nothing drives me more crazy than seeing people store their tomatoes and avocados in the refrigerator. Argggghh! Cold tomatoes go mushy quickly and taste terrible! Ditto for avocado.

A good way to remember is to take note of your local Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods. Where are they storing their produce? You hopefully never see refrigerated avocados and tomatoes.

Same goes for bananas, apples and oranges. Room temperature is the perfect way to consume these foods. Though you can sometimes slow the ripening process, there really are no benefits to making your fruit colder than it needs to be.

I don’t even like my lettuce cold so I’ll often take it out of the fridge an hour or so before I plan to make a giant salad.  Weird, yes, but there is a taste difference.

Don’t give up on fruit – I’ve never been a fan of honeydew. What a tasteless waste of time. Next to it’s awesome melon cousins of watermelon and cantaloupe, honeydew felt like an uninvited guest showing up at the party.

A few weeks ago my local Trader Joe’s ran out of organic mini watermelons and instead stocked organic honeydew melons. What?? After much internal debate, I reluctantly placed a few in my cart, reasoning that I should probably act like an adult and give it another try.

Guess what?  I loved it! The same consistency and flavor as a cantaloupe, but with much lighter notes.  All these years I missed out on eating such a satisfying fruit because I most likely hadn’t eaten one ripe, or had a few bad ones, or eaten ones that weren’t in season.

Don’t be afraid to try fruits you haven’t had, or try those again you thought you didn’t like.  I didn’t really eat papaya until a few years ago.  Now it’s one of my favorite fruits.  Drizzled with a little lime juice, it has a unique flavor that I crave.

All these tips will assist with how to eat more fruit.  You might move up to eating fruit as a meal or maybe easily double what you already eat on a daily basis.  Either way, just start eating more fruit.

EatPlantsLiveWell!

 

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